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Ranking the teams that qualified for Euro 2020 so far

Ranking the teams that qualified for Euro 2020 so far

All but four spots have been filled for the 24-team European Championship, and with the tournament starting to take shape, here’s a ranking of the favorites in descending order:

20. Finland

  • How it qualified: Group J runner-up
  • Euro 2016 result: Didn’t qualify

It’s doubtful that Teemu Pukki and Co. can replicate Iceland’s shocking last-eight debut in 2016, though simply qualifying is an accomplishment. Finland’s 32 prior attempts at making a major tournament were the second-most without success behind Luxembourg’s 34.

19. Czech Republic

  • How it qualified: Group A runner-up
  • Euro 2016 result: Group stage

Of the teams to book a spot at Euro 2020, the Czech Republic conceded the most goals (11) in qualifying and had the worst goal differential (plus-two). If you’re looking for a feel-good story, 30-year-old FC Dallas forward Zdenek Ondrasek scored the winner on his international debut versus England last month.

18. Austria

  • How it qualified: Group G runner-up
  • Euro 2016 result: Group stage

Congrats to Austria on finishing ahead of powerhouses North Macedonia, Slovenia, Israel, and Latvia to book its spot. All jokes aside, attacker Marcel Sabitzer is having a stellar season at RB Leipzig and Marko Arnautovic and David Alaba are dependable.

17. Ukraine

GENYA SAVILOV / AFP / Getty
  • How it qualified: Group B winner
  • Euro 2016 result: Group stage

Fine, we won’t say Ukraine is weak. Unfortunately, Ukraine’s not great, either. However, Andriy Shevchenko’s charges did top its group without tasting defeat and conceded only four goals, two of which came in a meaningless finale against Serbia. All eyes will be on Gent forward Roman Yaremchuk and West Ham winger Andriy Yarmolenko.

16. Wales

  • How it qualified: Group E runner-up
  • Euro 2016 result: Lost to Portugal in semifinals

You’d fancy Wales’ chances if the format changed to five-a-side. In Tuesday’s pivotal win over Hungary, pace-merchants Gareth Bale and Daniel James flanked Aaron Ramsey, and the trio oozed quality. It’s slim pickings elsewhere, though Harry Wilson’s dead-ball skills are world-class.

15. Denmark

  • How it qualified: Group C runner-up
  • Euro 2016 result: Didn’t qualify

Shock Euro 1992 winners Denmark averaged nearly three goals per match in progressing from Group C and has match-winners in Christian Eriksen, Kasper Dolberg, and Yussuf Poulsen. Andreas Christensen, Thomas Delaney, and Pierre-Emile Hojberg form a solid spine, as well.

14. Russia

  • How it qualified: Group I runner-up
  • Euro 2016 result: Group stage

With the fourth-most shots and fifth-most goals scored in qualifiers, Russia will depend on the exploits of Artem Dzyuba and the creative contributions of Aleksei Miranchuk and Aleksandr Golovin. Or, it could face a potential doping ban from the World Anti-Doping Agency.

13. Switzerland

Catherine Ivill / Getty Images Sport / Getty
  • How it qualified: Group C winner
  • Euro 2016 result: Lost to Poland in round of 16

Switzerland has appeared in seven of the last eight major tournaments, and Vladimir Petkovic’s players are experts at seeing out results without looking overly impressive. Xherdan Shaqiri, Granit Xhaka, and Denis Zakaria form the core, while Breel Embolo’s return to fitness could play a big factor.

12. Sweden

  • How it qualified: Group F runner-up
  • Euro 2016 result: Group stage

Sweden has been decent, and its 23 goals were tops among group runner-ups. However, 14 of those came against Malta and the Faroe Islands. On the bright side, the emergence of forwards Robin Quaison and Aleksander Isak has filled the void left by Ola Toivonen’s retirement.

11. Turkey

  • How it qualified: Group H runner-up
  • Euro 2016 result: Group stage

Juventus defender Merih Demiral and Leicester City center-back Caglar Soyuncu anchor a resolute backline that allowed a scant three goals in 10 qualifiers. Boosted by seven clean sheets, Turkey didn’t concede from open play or in any of its home fixtures. It’s a potential dark-horse pick.

10. Poland

  • How it qualified: Group G winner
  • Euro 2016 result: Lost to Portugal in quarterfinals

Poland progressed from arguably the worst group but the sky is the limit for a side that narrowly missed a semifinal spot at Euro 2016 if Robert Lewandowski’s surreal goal-scoring rate continues through next summer. Arkadiusz Milik and Krzysztof Piatek round out a solid strikeforce.

9. Croatia

Emilio Andreoli – UEFA / UEFA / Getty
  • How it qualified: Group E winner
  • Euro 2016 result: Lost to Portugal in round of 16

World Cup finalists Croatia emerged from a feeble group with little trouble, though underwhelming away draws at Azerbaijan and Wales are hardly the stuff of lore. Dynamo Zagreb forward Mislav Orsic is the one to watch amid a stellar club campaign both domestically and in the Champions League.

8. Netherlands

  • How it qualified: Group C runner-up
  • Euro 2016 result: Didn’t qualify

Netherlands’ otherworldly stars Virgil van Dijk, Frenkie de Jong, and Matthijs de Ligt share the pitch with the likes of Ryan Babel on an unbalanced side that could heavily depend on Memphis Depay’s exploits going forward. Somebody remind Ronaldo Koeman that Wout Weghorst exists.

7. Germany

  • How it qualified: Group C winner
  • Euro 2016 result: Lost to France in semifinals

Several key cogs of the Germany team that flopped at the 2018 World Cup are gone, though the likes of Serge Gnabry, Leon Goretzka, Kai Havertz, and Julian Brandt have adequately filled the cracks. Striker Timo Werner’s curious international form – he didn’t score in Russia – is set to play a deciding role.

6. Spain

  • How it qualified: Group F winner
  • Euro 2016 result: Lost to Italy in round of 16

Lacking the star power of the side that bookended the 2010 World Cup win with Euro successes in 2008 and 2012, Spain features a blossoming group of younger players like Fabian Ruiz, Dani Olmo, and Rodri. La Roja boasts the third-best goal differential (plus-21) in qualifying. Also, Luis Enrique is back.

5. Italy

Claudio Villa / Getty Images Sport / Getty
  • How it qualified: Group J winner
  • Euro 2016 result: Lost to Germany in quarterfinals

As one of two nations that went 10-for-10 in qualifying (along with Belgium), Italy conceded just four times while scoring 37 goals for the best goal differential among the 55 nations vying for a Euro 2020 berth. The three-man midfield of Marco Verratti, Nicolo Barella, and Jorginho is a strength for a balanced side blessed with depth.

4. Portugal

  • How it qualified: Group B runner-up
  • Euro 2016 result: Beat France in final

Defending champ Portugal scored 11 goals during the 2016 qualifying. Ronaldo has that many himself this time around. This Portugal team is objectively more talented with the likes of Ruben Neves, Bernardo Silva, Ricardo Pereira, and Joao Felix set to play big roles.

3. England

  • How it qualified: Group A winner
  • Euro 2016 result: Lost to Iceland in round of 16

England averaged 4.6 goals per match as the joint-highest-scoring team (37 goals) in qualifiers despite playing in two fewer games than co-leader Italy. A semifinal run at the World Cup should help a side blessed with an abundance of young talent. Harry Kane led the qualifying stage with 12 goals.

2. Belgium

  • How it qualified: Group I winner
  • Euro 2016 result: Lost to Wales in quarterfinals

Could 2020 finally be Belgium’s year? This might be the last shot for the country’s “Golden Generation.” With world-class players at most positions and the emergence of Youri Tielemans and Timothy Castagne giving Roberto Martinez welcomed selection headaches, the Red Devils have all the pieces.

1. France

Tim Clayton – Corbis / Corbis Sport / Getty
  • How it qualified: Group H winner
  • Euro 2016 result: Lost to Portugal in final

It’s hard to look past World Cup holder France when it comes to determining the Euro favorite, especially after Didier Deschamps’ lot made the Euro 2016 showpiece only to lose in extra time. The current iteration of Les Bleus is much better than the 2016 group that included Laurent Koscielny, Bacary Sagna, and Patrice Evra as starters.